News

38 Pedestrians were Killed on Scotland’s Roads Last Year

Bike Smart Road Safety Week 2018

Pedestrians are the most vulnerable group of road users. 38 pedestrians died as a direct result of a road accident in Scotland last year, an increase of 6 lost lives. Overall, however, there has been a significant decrease in the number of pedestrian casualties – 1,350 total recorded in 2017. The decrease is also a long term trend.

399 of pedestrian casualties were children, two died and 106 were seriously injured. These incidents nearly all took place in built up areas.

For all age groups 95% of pedestrian casualties occur in built up areas. Even when using a pedestrian crossing  people have to remain alert to drivers failing to slow down or stop. Some drivers may also be impatient with those who take longer to cross due to mobility issues. Pedestrians also have a responsibility to cross the road safely.

The nature of the incidents are more serious on the non built up roads with over half of those pedestrians being either killed or seriously injured.

In more rural locations there often is nowhere for pedestrians to walk except on the road. This makes them especially vulnerable with the need to See and Be Seen. People of all ages are being encouraged to have a more active lifestyle and walking is the easiest and cheapest for those with no mobility issues.

20 mph speed limit

Many places now have 20mph limits around schools at busy times of the day. The Rural Economy and Connectivity Committee in the Scottish Parliament is looking at proposed legislation for a 20 mile per hour speed limit in built up areas being in place throughout Scotland.

“The Restricted Roads (20 mph Speed Limit) (Scotland) Bill would reduce the speed limit on most residential and urban streets (technically known as restricted roads) from 30mph to 20mph. The aims of the Bill include improving pedestrian and cyclist health and safety, and reducing pollution from vehicle emissions.”

The committee is seeking views on this until 28th of January 2019. You can send in written opinion or use an online survey.

Links to further information and survey here: Bill Survey and Information

And for vehicle users:

Reporter: Fiona Grahame


 

 

 

 

Categories: News, Uncategorized

1 reply »

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.