Culture

HMS Royal Oak: Building the Replica

Paul Tyler 6

It took Paul Tyler over 600 hours of meticulous intricate work to craft his amazing model of HMS Royal Oak.

Paul Tyler 5 Royal Oak and Paul

At a talk in the Orkney Library and Archives on Saturday 22nd of February, Paul Tyler of Peedie Models explained how he went about constructing such an accurate model of the Royal Oak.

Paul explained that when he starts any commissioned model he thinks about what the person who has ordered it expects. In the finished version he wants his model to replicate the excitement and passion the customer has for the project.

The design process for such a large model had to be broken down into manageable pieces. The history of the vessel had to be research and Paul had to look to see what parts were already available. The rest he would make himself from his two 3D printers.

Paul Tyler 3 Large Plans for the Royal Oak

The information gathering involved getting the design plans of the vessel and any photos that were available.

The hull for the model was available. It was of the sister ship of the Royal Oak, HMS Sovereign. As Paul went about constructing the model it became apparent that the hull, made of fibre glass, wasn’t quite right and he had to adapt it.

There is no step by step set of instructions for a unique model such as this and Paul had to sequence this himself, breaking it down into the smaller steps.

Looking at the plans took 3 days but this was an essential part to get it right and where accurate measurements were taken.

Painting the hull took two and half days. Paul even contacted the Admiralty to get the colours just right.

Paul made many of the parts in his own workshop using 3D printers. Where some parts were able to be bought often they had to be adapted.

The model of HMS Royal Oak that Paul has made is in a private collection. It is truly magnificent and he already has an order in from another buyer.

To find out more about HMS Royal Oak click on these links:

Reporter: Fiona Grahame

Paul Tyler 1 Talk on the Royal Oak

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